X64 Language Windows

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This topic captures known issues that affect language provisioning in Windows 10.

X64

In this article. You can use Windows Setup to deploy a multilingual edition of Windows. This is a typical scenario for corporations that deploy Windows in a multilingual environment where the users must be able to switch the display language between multiple languages on a single computer. .The number aligns to the month (e.g., 9 = September), and the letter aligns to the quality update type. See this blog post for more information on the monthly update terminology and servicing cadence. Adding language packs in Windows 10, version 1803 and later versions: Known issue.

Adding Local Experience Packs (LXPs) in Windows 10 version 2004 and later versions: Known issue

When servicing a Windows image with a cumulative monthly security update or public preview, the corresponding LXP ISO for that update needs to be downloaded and installed for the LXPs to work correctly. If this step is skipped, then the user may experience unexpected language fallback (e.g., see text in a language that they cannot understand) until they are able to update their LXP via the Microsoft Store. Note that LXPs cannot be updated until OOBE is completed (i.e., device has reached the Desktop) and the device has established internet connectivity.

To find the correct LXP ISO for your associated monthly quality update, look for the abbreviation of your update in the LXP ISO filename (e.g., 9B). If a quality update doesn't have a corresponding LXP ISO, use the LXP ISO from the previous release.

Monthly quality updateServicing update file name and KB articleLXP ISO part numbers and/or filenames
*9B2020-09 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 2004 for x64-based Systems (KB4571756)
  • X22-38604 Win 10 2004 64/ARM64 MultiLang OPK LangPackAll/LIP (9B LXP ONLY)
  • or
  • Windows 10, version 2004 or 20H2 9B Local Experience Packs (LXPs) (released Oct 2020)
  • *9C2020-09 Cumulative Update Preview for Windows 10 Version 2004 for x64-based Systems (KB4577063)
  • X22-41692 Win 10 2004 64/ARM64 MultiLang OPK LangPackAll/LIP (9C LXP ONLY)
  • or
  • Windows 10, version 2004 or 20H2 9C Local Experience Packs (LXPs) (released Oct 2020)
  • *10C2020-10 Cumulative Update Preview for Windows 10 Version 2004 for x64-based Systems (KB4580364)
  • X22-44317 Win 10 2004 64/ARM64 MultiLang OPK LangPackAll/LIP (10C LXP ONLY)
  • or
  • Windows 10, version 2004 or 20H2 10C Local Experience Packs (LXPs) (released Nov 2020)
  • *11C2020-11 Cumulative Update Preview for Windows 10 Version 2004 for x64-based Systems (KB4586853)
  • X22-47510 Win 10 2004 64/ARM64 MultiLang OPK LangPackAll/LIP (11C LXP ONLY)
  • or
  • Windows 10, version 2004 or 20H2 11C Local Experience Packs (LXPs) (released Dec 2020)
  • *The number aligns to the month (e.g., 9 = September), and the letter aligns to the quality update type. See this blog post for more information on the monthly update terminology and servicing cadence.

    Adding language packs in Windows 10, version 1803 and later versions: Known issue

    In Windows 10, version 1803 (build 17134) and later versions, you use Lpksetup.exe or Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM.exe) to add language packs to an image. However, the language does not automatically appear in the list of Windows display languages under Settings > Time & Language > Language.

    Cause

    Professional obligationsms. schrader's teaching portfolio assessment. Beginning in Windows 10, version 1803, a background cleanup task removes language packs that are not actively used. The list of Windows display languages shows only the languages of the language packs that have been used. It is possible for the cleanup task to remove a language pack before the language pack can be used.

    Resolution

    The specific steps to resolve this issue depend on the version of Windows 10 that you are using.

    Windows 10, version 1903(build 18362) and later

    After you install the language pack, change the Group Policy that governs the affected computer. To do this, set the BlockCleanupOfUnusedPreinstalledLangPacks Group Policy Object (GPO) to Yes.

    X64 Language Windows 7

    After you make this change, the added language remains visible under Settings > Time & Language > Language > Windows display language.

    Windows 10, versions 1803 and 1809

    Important

    When you run the commands that are described in this section, you must use the security context of the user who will use the language pack. If more than one user will be using the system, you have to run these commands under the security context of each user in turn.

    After you install the language pack, add the language pack to the user language list. To do this, open a Windows PowerShell window, and run the following commands:

    In these commands, <language> represents the language code of the language pack that you want to add.

    To verify that the language pack was added to the user language list, run the Get-WinUserLanguageList cmdlet.

    Example

    Note

    This example adds the Spanish language pack (“es-es') to the list of Windows display languages. To add other language packs, replace all instances of “es-es” with the language code of the desired language pack.

    1. Install a language pack by using Lpksetup.exe or DISM.exe. To do this, open an elevated Command Prompt window, and run one of the following commands:

    2. Verify that the language pack is installed. To do this, type the following command at an elevated command prompt:

    3. Depending on the version of Windows 10, do one of the following:

      • Windows 10, version 1903(build 18362) and later: Change the Group Policy that governs the affected computer. Set the BlockCleanupOfUnusedPreinstalledLangPacks Group Policy Object (GPO) to Yes.
      • Windows 10, versions 1803 and 1809: Open a PowerShell window and run the following commands:
    4. To verify that the language is now available, do one of the following:

      • In a PowerShell window, run Get-WinUserLanguageList.
      • Select Settings > Time & Language > Language > Windows display language, and verify that Español (España) appears.

    Windows 7 X64 Language Pack Download

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