Aperture 3.5 Mac Downloadbrownsearch

Posted on

Sharpness at 20mm

During today's iPad-centric event, Apple announced that more than 20 iOS and Mac apps would receive updates over the course of the day. Aperture, Apple's photo editing and management software, has just been updated to version 3.5 adding new features and bug fixes. The update includes support. All forums Mac Talk Change forum. Was a mistake buying Aperture 3.5 to replace LR 5? Started Nov 29, 2013 Discussions Forum ‹ Previous: 1: 2: Next › Threaded. Not much of an Aperture update if all 3.5 (from 3.4) does is provide hooks for taking advantage of a faster machine that won't ship until Xmas. Do we know that 3.5 is the update Apple mentioned in. The latest version of Aperture is 3.5 on Mac Informer. It is a perfect match for Viewers & Editors in the Design & Photo category. The app is developed by Apple Inc. And its user rating is 4.3 out of 5.

Mac

For this test, the Panasonic Lumix S 20-60mm f/3.5-5.6 lens was attached to a Panasonic S1R body, which was in turn mounted to a sturdy tripod. Exposure delay mode was activated and image stabilisation turned off. Tonal and colour variance across the crops are due to change in natural light during the session.

Game

The full frame at 20mm

At 20mm, the maximum aperture is f/3.5. In these test images we can see that detail is sharp across the entire aperture range, save for f/22 where the effect of diffraction (an overall softness) is seen. We have to say though, that even at f/22 the overall softness is only really visible when really scrutinising a picture. There is an ever-so-slight softness at the maximum f/3.5 aperture, but again you have to strain to see it.

Apple Aperture 3.5

Perhaps what is most impressive is how centre sharpness is maintained pretty much all the way to the very corners of the picture. In real world images there are other factors at play effecting corner sharpness, namely shallow depth of field especially at the more open apertures. But at a level plane to your subject, detail is sharp in the entire frame.

Our hyper critical observations would confirm that the sweet spot of the lens at 20mm is between f/5.6 and up to f/11, but we would have no hesitation to use this lens even at its maximum aperture if sharpness is the main concern (there are lens distortions present at f/3.5 in chromatic aberration and vignetting).

Truly though, we have been surprised by just how sharp this lens is. It's not critically sharp in the same way as lenses three times the price, but it is very sharp indeed!

ApertureCentre CropEdge Crop
f/3.5
f/4
f/5.6
f/8
f/11
f/16
f/22
Next PageSharpness: 2 »

In June 2014, Apple announced that development of Aperture has been discontinued. Since then, Apple has released six major macOS upgrades. For technical reasons, macOS Mojave is the last version of macOS to run Aperture. Starting with macOS Catalina, Aperture is no longer compatible with macOS.

To continue working with your Aperture photo libraries, you must migrate them to another photo app. You can migrate them to the Photos app, which is included with macOS Yosemite or later, or migrate them to Adobe Lightroom Classic or another app. You should do this before upgrading to macOS Catalina.

Aperture 3 Mac

3.5Aperture

Migrate your library to Photos

Apple aperture 3.5

If you're using macOS Mojave or earlier

Follow these steps if you're using macOS Mojave or earlier:

Aperture 3.5

  1. Open Aperture.
  2. Choose Aperture > Preferences, click the Previews tab, then change the Photo Preview setting to Don't Limit. Close the preferences window.
  3. From the list of projects in the Library inspector, select all of your projects. For example, click the first project listed, then press and hold the Shift key while clicking the last project.
  4. Click the Browser layout button in the toolbar, so that all photos are shown as thumbnails.
  5. Choose Edit > Select All to select all of your photos.
  6. Press and hold the Option key, then choose Photos > Generate Previews.
  7. Aperture now generates full-size previews for every photo in your library. To follow its progress, choose Window > Show Activity from the menu bar. Quit Aperture when processing is complete.
  8. Open the Photos app, then choose your Aperture library when prompted, as pictured above. If you aren't prompted to choose a library, press and hold the Option key while opening Photos. If your Aperture library isn’t listed, click Other Library, then locate and choose your library.

When Photos shows the photos from your Aperture library, migration is complete.

If you're using macOS Catalina

Starting with macOS Catalina, Aperture is no longer compatible with macOS. If you upgraded to macOS Catalina before migrating your library to Photos, follow these steps:

  1. Install the latest macOS Catalina updates. Your Mac must be using macOS Catalina 10.15.1 or later.
  2. If you migrated your library to Photos after installing macOS Catalina 10.15 but before updating to macOS Catalina 10.15.1, complete these steps before continuing:
    1. Select your Aperture library in the Finder. By default, it's named Aperture Library and is in the Pictures folder of your home folder.
    2. Choose File > Get Info. An Info window for your Aperture library opens.
    3. In the Name & Extension section of the Info window, replace .migratedphotolibrary at the end of the file name with .aplibrary. Then close the window.
  3. Open the Photos app, then choose your Aperture library when prompted, as pictured above. If you aren't prompted to choose a library, press and hold the Option key while opening Photos. If your Aperture library isn’t listed, click Other Library, then locate and choose your library.

When Photos shows the photos from your Aperture library, migration is complete. Learn more about how Photos migration works and how Photos handles content, metadata, and smart albums from Aperture.

Migrate your library to Adobe Lightroom Classic

Adobe Lightroom Classic version 5.7 and later includes a built-in tool for migrating Aperture libraries to Lightroom catalogs.

If you’ve upgraded to macOS Catalina, learn about compatibility with Lightroom Classic.

When an Aperture library is migrated to Lightroom, your library's organization, metadata, and image adjustments are preserved, with some exceptions:

  • RAW files are migrated, but Aperture's non-destructive adjustment layer does not. Lightroom’s migrator tool includes an option to export and migrate Aperture’s full-size JPEG previews for edited images. If you want to preserve your Aperture edits in another format, export the edited images from Aperture first, then reimport them into Lightroom after migrating your library.
  • Projects, folders, and albums are migrated to Lightroom collections and collection sets.
  • Faces, color labels, and stacks are migrated as keywords.
  • Rejected images are migrated to a collection.
  • Slideshows are migrated as collections.
  • Smart Albums and custom metadata fields aren't migrated.
  • Album organization is alphabetical, so manual sidebar organization might not be preserved.
  • Custom metadata fields aren't migrated.

Export your Aperture library

You can also export the contents of your Aperture library to back it up or to import into another app.